Home Author Interview Blog Tour: Don’t Let the Wind Catch You by Aaron Paul Lazar

Blog Tour: Don’t Let the Wind Catch You by Aaron Paul Lazar

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Savor the Moment

It’s the last week of May. Our record breaking wet spring finally retracted its cold sticky tendrils, allowing the sun to warm the mornings and drench each morning with heavy dew. Today, as I rounded the top of a hill overlooking the valley, my breath caught in my throat. Before me lay the snaking path of the Genesee River, previously hidden from casual view behind fields and woods. Nebulous clouds of fog hovered above, revealing the river route that quietly meanders out of sight most of the year.

My soul exploded with a sensation of splendor best described by the Japanese philosophy, wabi sabi*. This was indeed a wabi sabi moment, a fraction of time linking nature and man, steeped in intense sensual beauty…so full of wonder it transports you to a moment of spiritual enlightenment.

In addition to the vapor-bound river, the countryside lay punctuated with farmers’ ponds, exposed via banks of fog steaming overhead. Normally hidden by tall fields of grass or corn, the wisps of moisture called attention to the quiet shallows, home to frogs and watering holes for livestock.

Stunned by the beauty, invigorated beyond belief, I continued on the drive that I’d taken thousands of times before. Heading north on River Road, whispers of “Thank you, God,” floated in my brain. Still and amorphous, the words vibrated in syncopation with stirring grasses.

Once again, nature presented a feast so lovely I choked with emotion. There, to the east, clusters of tall grass waved in the sunlight with heavy heads bowed under the weight of soaking dew, their curvatures swan-like as they moved in glistening silence.

The ephemeral nature of this phenomenon is part of the allure. That precise moment of intense immersion, that amazing connection with nature, will never repeat. The sun’s rays may not hit the grass with exactly the same angle or intensity. The grass will change tomorrow, perhaps drier, taller, or shorn. This transient moment of staggering beauty must be absorbed and cherished.

 

It’s scenes like this I envisioned when writing Don’t Let The Wind Catch You, the sequel to Tremolo: cry of the loon, where in 1965 young Gus LeGarde meets Tully, a crotchety old hermit who hangs out in his woodland cabin with the spirit of a young Indian girl, Penaki, who’s bound to the earth until her past is avenged. Gus is challenged in this difficult summer, he must summon every ounce of courage to survive and stand up for what’s right. But the entire time he’s doing his personal battle, he’s in the woods, or on a horse, or in the garden, or at the ocean. Nature plays a huge part in this book, and in the LeGarde Mystery series in general. Scenes from my own youth play heavily in the story, as do current day excursions into the woods of the Genesee Valley.

What path do writers take to experience this phenomenon of being moved by nature to such an extent that they are compelled to write about it? How do they open the channels in the brain that might have been content to listen to Haydn’s 19th Symphony in C Major, but blind to nature’s offerings? (this was playing on the radio when I delighted in these visions today.)

First of all, one must be a “visualist.” That isn’t a real word, but it describes what I mean. A person who is stunned by physical natural beauty (certainly not at the exclusion of aural, tactile, or emotional stimuli) possesses visual aqueducts to the world through his or her eyes. Infinitesimal flashes of stunning images move him beyond belief. These impressions are captured in his mind’s eye, never to be lost, forever to be savored. And often, when this type of writer is creating, they see the “movie in their mind,” pressing from within, allowing readers to feel intimate and involved in a scene.

What type of a reader are you? Do you soak up scenes written by others? Imagine them for days on end? Find choice gems of passages that affect you for life? Do you want your readers to feel this way about your own prose?

It is this deeply felt appreciation for nature, for life, for wonder, that promotes a good writer to potential majesty. Perhaps not to best-seller status—that illusory fate is in the hands of a publishing industry often not tuned into art, but focused solely on profit. Try to ignore that aspect when you are creating your next masterpiece. In time, if the stars are aligned and you achieve this pinnacle of greatness, it may happen.

Open your eyes. Reel it in. Absorb the beauty around you, whether it is the flash of love in an old woman’s eye, or the fragile petal of a tiny orange cinquefoil. Allow yourself to be in that moment, record it in your soul, and play it back for your readers for the ultimate connection.

 

And be ever so grateful… for this life of ours is a gift. Don’t waste it!

 

* Wabi Sabi for Writers, by Richard Powell, Adams Media.

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Release Day Facebook Event 8/15
https://www.facebook.com/events/463418317083759/
Celebrating the Release of Don’t Let The Wind Catch by Aaron Paul Lazar

Talk with Aaron and ask him questions about his book.

Aaron will be doing contests and giveaways throughout the event of free E-books and Print Books Amazon of Don’t Let The Wind Catch.

Book Description
When young Gus LeGarde befriends a cranky old hermit in the woods who speaks to an Indian spirit, he wonders if the man is nuts. But when the ghostly Penni rattles tin cups, draws on dusty mirrors, and flips book pages, pestering him to find evidence to avenge her past, things change.

What Gus doesn’t understand is why his mother hates Tully, until his relentless investigation uncovers a hint of scandal about Tully and Gus’s grandfather, Marlowe Wright.

On horseback, Gus and his friends ride through woods overlooking Conesus Lake to Tully’s abandoned house, reportedly still infected with the Genesee Valley Fever from the 1700s. Unafraid, they enter and find shocking evidence that could rewrite history.

Can Gus convince his mother to forgive Tully? And will the proof he found free Penni’s spirit?

Gus summons courage beyond his years in this poignant and powerful telling of the summer of 1965.
• Bridges the gap between YA and adult ala Harry Potter
• “Suspenseful, satisfying, well-crafted, mood-capturing, for both adults and children.”
• Will appeal to readers who crave adventure, who love horses, the sea, or the outdoors, and who may be curious/nostalgic about children’s lives in 1965.
• Will appeal to teachers and parents who want to impart anti-bullying, anti-bigotry behavior; including compassion and acceptance in a thoughtful, sensitive manner.
• Will appeal to mystery buffs who loved the award-winning Tremolo: cry of the loon featuring Gus LeGarde in a prequel to the series in 1964.
• Showcases goodness, morality, understanding, acceptance, courage, persistence, and love.
• Readers can forget today’s furious Internet-driven scene and maybe evoke a few of their own comforting childhood memories and adventures

BLURB:
When young Gus LeGarde befriends a cranky old hermit in the woods who speaks to an Indian spirit, he wonders if the man is nuts. But when the ghostly Penni rattles tin cups, draws on dusty mirrors, and flips book pages, pestering him to find evidence to avenge her past, things change.

What Gus doesn’t understand is why his mother hates Tully, until his relentless investigation uncovers a hint of scandal about Tully and Gus’s grandfather, Marlowe Wright.

On horseback, Gus and his friends ride through woods overlooking Conesus Lake to Tully’s abandoned house, reportedly still infected with the Genesee Valley Fever from the 1700s. Unafraid, they enter and find shocking evidence that could rewrite history.

Can Gus convince his mother to forgive Tully? And will the proof he found free Penni’s spirit?

Gus summons courage beyond his years in this poignant and powerful telling of the summer of 1965.
• Bridges the gap between YA and adult ala Harry Potter
• “Suspenseful, satisfying, well-crafted, mood-capturing, for both adults and children.”
• Will appeal to readers who crave adventure, who love horses, the sea, or the outdoors, and who may be curious/nostalgic about children’s lives in 1965.
• Will appeal to teachers and parents who want to impart anti-bullying, anti-bigotry behavior; including compassion and acceptance in a thoughtful, sensitive manner.
• Will appeal to mystery buffs who loved the award-winning Tremolo: cry of the loon featuring Gus LeGarde in a prequel to the series in 1964.
• Showcases goodness, morality, understanding, acceptance, courage, persistence, and love.
• Readers can forget today’s furious Internet-driven scene and maybe evoke a few of their own comforting childhood memories and adventures
BIO
Aaron Paul Lazar writes to soothe his soul. The author of three award-winning mystery series and more, Lazar enjoys the Genesee Valley countryside in upstate New York, where his characters embrace life, play with their dogs and grandkids, grow sumptuous gardens, and chase bad guys. Visit his website at lazarbooks.com and watch for his upcoming release from Twilight Times Books, SANCTUARY (2013).
ONLINE LINKS:
• Website http://www.lazarbooks.com
• Blog http://www.aaronlazar.blogspot.com
• Facebook Name: AaronPaulLazar
• Twitter Name : @aplazar
• Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/629566.Aaron_Paul_Lazar
• Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Aaron-Paul-Lazar/e/B001JOZR2M/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1
Giveaway code
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BUY NOW LINK:
• Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Dont-Let-Wind-Catch-ebook/dp/B00ECNEOTE/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1376403785&sr=1-1-spell&keywords=Dont+let+the+wind+cath+you
• Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dont-let-the-wind-catch-you-aaron-paul-lazar/1116333937?ean=2940148693291

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